Italian Galumpki (Polish with an Italian Infusions)

Thank you so much to our member Melissa who says, “I wanted to share a recipe on the blog – but was having some trouble figuring out how to do so. I have included it in this attachment if it is faster to just add it on your own as opposed to explain how to post on the blog. I am happy to do what is easiest for you! This has been our first year as a shareholder and it won’t be our last! We have LOVED this experience!”

My mom, an Italian at heart (she’s really only 50%, but I didn’t know that until I was over 18!) – married my Dad, who is much closer to being 100% Polish. Mom grew up loving garlic – Dad, well he learned to LOVE garlic. He didn’t quite understand the intensity and beauty of it’s flavor until they were married a few years. Now he does – so almost 30 years later, our family has a dish that is quite tasty, is both Italian and Polish and freezes AMAZINGLY well! J

Ingredients:

  • 1 head of cabbage
  • 1 lb beef (or any ground meat)
  • 2 cloves minced garlic (or to taste, you can also omit this but then it would just be galumpki)
  • salt and peper to taste
  • 1 cup brown rice (or to taste, use more less stuck together and more like Galumpki, use less and more like a meatball! Both tasty, I prefer less – it’s a texture thing!)
  • 1 can cream of mushroom soup
  • 2 cans tomato soup
  • 2 cans milk

 Directions:

  • Pre-heat oven to 350
  • core cabbage
  • boil cabbage in a large pot until leaves are tender but NOT soft/mushy
  • while cabbage is boiling, prepare meat mixture
    • mix 1 lb ground meat with salt, pepper, minced garlic, cream of mushroom soup and rice
    • prepare a 9×13 glass pan, and probably another smaller glass pan depending on size of head of cabbage and amount of meat/rice mixture you make
      • empty 1 can of tomato soup into pan, mix with 1 can of milk
      • When cabbage leaves are tender but NOT soft/mushy, remove from heat and run under cold water to stop the cooking process
      • peel leaves off one by one and place into colander (when you get to the end it is easiest to let the water from the faucet fill up each leaf so that you don’t break them)
      • now, put about 1.5 spoonfuls of meat mixture into the middle of one leaf
      • roll both the top and the bottom down over the meat, and then in the opposite direction roll up the remaining
      • open second can of soup, mix in separate container with 1 can of milk and pour over the top
      • put tinfoil over the top of the pan
      • cook for 60 minutes at 350

 Yields Approximately 20 Italian Galumpki!

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About stillmansfarm

Stillman's Farm® is a family owned farm in Massachusetts. We currently operate at two locations: a greenhouse/retail business in Lunenburg, and the majority of vegetable production in New Braintree. Glenn Stillman started the business in Lunenburg over 20 years ago and now enjoys the promise of the next generation further expanding the very diverse enterprise. The farm also has several Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) programs established in Boston, Lunenburg, Jamaica Plain, Brookline, New Braintree and the Southborough/Framingham area. In addition, the Stillman's trucks have become a fixture at the Boston Area Farmer's Markets. Our Philosophy Most of Stillman's produce is grown without chemicals. For a few crops this simply is not feasible. For these particular crops, we participate in the State Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program. This entails systematic scouting of fields, protection of beneficial insects, bio-controls, and well-timed applications of only the safest pesticides. With growing concern about genetically modified organisms (GMO), as a patron you can be confident that none of the produce we grow have been engineered, in fact, we often experiment with many heirloom varieties! Conscientiously Grown® The combination of no pesticides, good cultivation management, and IPM practices allows us to offer the widest possible selection of fruit and vegetable varieties and be a thriving sustainable farm. We have developed our own label, "conscientiously grown" to convey our commitment to the safety of our environment, family and customers. All of our hormone free, pasture raised meats carry a conscientiously grown label too!
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